Intel true 10bits/HEVC/HDR support... ?

  • Hm ok, I might test but my NUC7i5BNK is Gen7, no? Still worth a try even Intel mentions only Gen9?

  • Hm ok, I might test but my NUC7i5BNK is Gen7, no? Still worth a try even Intel mentions only Gen9?

    GPU generation is what's important here. Kaby Lake = Gen9 GPU.

  • No go for me :(


    Made sure prime hw decode was on (can see it’s using ff-hevc-drm_prime(HW)).


    Anyway, all I get is blank screen. Can see it’s playing though. No hdr switch not that it would help with no video :S


    Something is going funny with audio too as it isn’t picking up any device and is greyed out on Bluetooth, that may or may not be related.


    For the record this is clean install on an empty m2 so happy to try again in the future if needs be.


    Tv is Samsung UE40MU6400


    I can get you logs if you think it would help, but I’m by no means expecting you to support anything, just trying to help out test, which I feel may be a little too early to do yet.

    Edited once, last by PlatypusW ().

  • Same for me sadly on the NUC7i5BNK. Logs is like this:

    Tried "Direct-To-Plane" and "EGL" in the PRIME settings.

  • So I get no audio on boot. Is there a reason you decided to go with PulseAudio instead of the stock ALSA like vanilla LibreELEC? Just like PlatypusW pointed out you just get a greyed out choice in Settings -> System -> Audio that says PulseAudio Bluetooth.


    I do see that by default all my HW acceleration is enabled including Prime. I will attempt a video test but I can't guarantee a failed video is actually legit failed as i've had this issue on other builds that use Pulse that if the audio isn't working properly, video will not work properly.


    EDIT: Yup, I get nothing when I try to play a video, but I don't consider this a failed test yet as I had similar issues play ANY content in RetroELEC that also uses PulseAudio instead of ALSA. I adjusted the kodi in it to use ALSA and video playback started working properly.


    EDIT2: d9e85 - Ghostbin

    Edited 2 times, last by pletopia ().

  • I didn't do anything to the audio part, ALSA works fine on my Gemini Lake box. Maybe it has something to do with this.

  • i ordered a NUC8 i3 but cancelled after seeing this thread

    good to see progress on LSPCON HDR but wont buy until its working as my NUC6 works fine just does not do HDR

  • Audio works perfectly after the disabled HD Audio DSP in bios. Excellent.


    Unfortunately no video while playing a 4k HDR flick. I can hear audio, AVR displays Dolby Atmos properly, but only get black screen. Hitting 'o' pulls up the stream info and decoder is set to prime.


    Once again, this is on a i3 8th gen NUC

  • 4K 4:2:0 with Deep color is not a part of HDMI spec. It should always be 8-bit.

    No idea how to force YCbCr 4:4:4. Intel driver knows what's best for you and use RGB.

    That's not correct, if by Deep Color you mean >8-bit bit depth. In fact it's quite the opposite.


    4:2:0 is supported in 8, 10, 12 and 16-bin 2160p50/60 modes - it's the only sub-sampling format supported in all bit-depth outputs for 2160p50/60 modes. 4:2:0 was added to HDMI 2.0 - and is only supported for 2160p50/60 modes, with no support in 2160p24-30.


    RGB/4:4:4 are only supported in 8-bit at 2160p50/60 - so whilst you may be able to flag an HDR EOTF with 2160p50/60 RGB/4:4:4 output - you can't output 10-bit sources in 10-bit or 12-bit in an RGB or 4:4:4 mode with a 2160p50/60 output format. (RGB/4:4:4 is only an option for HDR at 2160p24-30)


    4:2:2 is the only >8 bit format supported for all 2160p frame rates - from 24p-60p. It is supported with 12-bit bit depth only. (So 8-bit SDR and 10-bit SDR or HDR (*) video is padded - there are no 8-bit, 10-bit or 16-bit onions for 4:2:2 output at any frame rate in the spec)


    4:2:2 is thus the ideal preferred mode for 2160p HDR output - as it is supported at all frame rates. (This is why it is used by a lot of consumer products)

    4:2:0 is the second best option for 2160p HDR output at 2160p50/60 - but can't be used for 2160p24-30.

    4:4:4/RGB is only an option for 2160p HDR in 2160p24-30 modes.


    Therefore if you can't use 4:2:2 for HDR output of 10-bit HDR material properly (i.e. without truncating to 8-bit) you have to use RGB/4:4:4 output for 2160p24-30, and 4:2:0 output for 2160p50/60. The only format supported in all frame rates is 4:2:2


    See attached HDMI 2.0 timings chart downloaded from the HDMI site. HDMI 2.0b or HDMI 2.1 may have added >8-bit depth support for RGB/4:4:4 in 2160p50/60 modes - but it certainly wasn't supported in HDMI 2.0 (or 2.0a AFAIK)


    (*) I watch quite a lot of self-mastered HD SDR 10-bit content - it looks so much nicer than 8-bit content covered in quantisation banding :)

  • That's not correct, if by Deep Color you mean >8-bit bit depth. In fact it's quite the opposite.

    I thought that was clarified back in February, not sure why you have to bring that up again.

    4:2:2 is the only >8 bit format supported for all 2160p frame rates

    4:2:2 is also irrelevant for any Intel hardware, not supported by the driver.

  • I thought that was clarified back in February, not sure why you have to bring that up again.

    4:2:2 is also irrelevant for any Intel hardware, not supported by the driver.


    Apologies - I hadn't remembered I'd previously posted that information in the same forum.


    So do Intel just support 4:2:0, 4:4:4 and RGB output?


    If so then 4:2:0 is the only format that will support 2160p50/60 with >8-bit for HDR - unless you are in the realms of HDMI 2.1 (or was >8 bit RGB/4:4:4 added in HDMI 2.0b for 2160p50 and above)?

  • So do Intel just support 4:2:0, 4:4:4 and RGB output?

    Yes.


    If so then 4:2:0 is the only format that will support 2160p50/60 with >8-bit for HDR

    Yes. but the driver default to RGB 8-bit. A driver hack is required in order to switch to 2160p50/60 4:2:0 12-bit.


    AMD behave a bit different - no 4:2:2 support either but the driver default to 4:2:0 12-bit for 2160p50/60 modes.

    Edited 3 times, last by smp ().

  • Yes.


    Yes. but the driver default to RGB 8-bit. A driver hack is required in order to switch to 2160p50/60 4:2:0 12-bit.


    AMD behave a bit different - no 4:2:2 support either but the driver default to 4:2:0 12-bit for 2160p50/60 modes.


    Great - so the industry standard for video production and post-production (4:2:2) - and the standard for connectivity in that area - is the one format that isn't supported...

  • Great - so the industry standard for video production and post-production (4:2:2) - and the standard for connectivity in that area - is the one format that isn't supported...

    They actually planned to support 4:2:2 as seen in this old patch but then it was dropped for some reason.

    I tried to enable 4:2:2 support in driver but it didn't work, I guess I missed something.